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Summer pond care; beating the algae

Pond Care

Beating the Algae

Pond keepers often face the hugely common problem of algae. Fortunately it’s a problem that can be overcome. This blog post will help with pond care by differentiating between the two predominant types of algae and discussing the best ways to get rid of them.

Identifying the type of algae

Most pond keepers will either experience one of two types of algae. The first is referred to as “Green water” which is thousands of microscopic algae cells floating about the water which gives the water a green colour. The second is filamentous algae which is often referred to as blanketweed.

The cause of algae

Like pond plants, algae thrives in an environment with lots of sunlight and nutrients in the water. Algae feeds on nutrients that are produced by organic matter such as leaves decaying at the bottom of the pond.

Getting rid of it

There are many algae treatments on the market which ultimately treat the symptom (the algae itself) but not the cause of it, which is the high nutrient load in the water. These can act as a great quick fix to get your pond looking good. We recommend the tetra algofin which we have in store. However it is also important to deal with the root of the problem to prevent the problem recurring.

The key to an algae free pond is to ensure regular seasonal maintenance is carried out.

Our seasonal recommendations

  1. –  Summer- Time to enjoy your pond , however your filter will be working overtime with all the increased sunlight so make sure your filter foams are cleaned at least once a week. Imagine how inefficient your hoover would be if you never cleaned it!?…. it’s the same for your pond filter!
  2. –  Autumn- Cut back any “leggy” plants and any dead leaves on your pond plants. If you are lucky enough to own a pond vacuum then this is the time use it. This will remove any unwanted sediment from the bottom of the pond. It is also important to net the pond. Doing this prevents any falling leaves falling into the pond; these will become a food source (nutrient) for algae in the spring when the water temperatures increase.
  3. –  Winter- Ensure any leaves and other debris that fall into the pond are removed and that an area of the pond is kept ice free with the use of a pond heater and pond pump,
  4. –  Spring– With all your hard work over the Autumn and winter there should be minimal waste products in the pond which will put you on a good footing for minimal algae issues in the summer. It’s worth using a pond vacuum again to remove any remaining sediment before the summer period hits . Pair this with replacing the U.V bulb in your pond filter. A new set of foams for the filter is a late Christmas present your pond will thank you for..

Other tips for a great pond this summer;

                Preferably fill up your pond with rain water from a water butt. This water is a better temperature and has less nutrients for the algae to feed on. If you are filling a pond (with fish) from the tap then do this gradually. This is becasuse the cold water can shock and harm the fish. Alternatively, fill a bucket and leave it to warm in the sun before pouring it into the pond.

                Be sure to leave anything that you remove from the pond on the edge for around 24 hours> This allows any trapped creatures  inside the matter to return to their habitat. To make sure smaller creatures can escape we suggest rinsing the weeds in a bucket.