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Pot ponds

When it comes to having a pond, you don’t need a mansion with a pond the size of a lake (though if you have a mansion why not)! Many ponds, especially ponds for wildlife, can be created in a simple pot. As well as attracting a range of insect life and maybe the odd amphibian, you will be able to grow a new range of plants namely aquatic and marginals.

Step One

Choose a pot from a garden centre (ours have a wonderful selection). If your pot has a drainage hole, block it up with a silicone sealant. If the pot is made from a porous material like terracotta,  seal the inside with yacht varnish. Alternatively you could line your pot with pond liner or choose a water tight container like a beer barrel.

Step Two

If you have a deep pot marginal and emergent plants need only a few centimetres of water, so sit them on upturned empty aquatic plant pots or other pots to raise them up.

Step Three

Put the pot where you want the finished pond to go. Fill the pot with rainwater or water that has been left to stand for a few days to de-chlorinate. Rainwater also helps nutrient levels stay low and avoids algal blooms that green your water.

Taking care of wildlife

If you pot is deep, ensure frogs, toads, newts and hedgehogs can get out by ensuring there are shallow areas at the edge of the pot e.g. stones or wooden ramps or a partly submerged stick.

Plants to consider

Look out for dwarf waterlilies and other compact growers. Ask our aquatics team for advice. Our range of aquatics plants are always changing so do keep popping in to see what is new. Native water plants are always a good bet, such as water crowfoot (Ranunculus aquatics), brooklime (Veronica beccabunga) and rigid hornwort (Ceratophyllum demersum).